Negotiating Do You Need To?

Whilst browsing the internet I came across a number of articles on negotiating and having read several began to wonder who these people were negotiating with and why were they bothering to negotiate at all. I was amazed at the language used in the articles and the suggestion that you would want to negotiate with someone you know is going to con you, stitch you up or rip you off. What does the person or organisation you distrust have that is worth the effort of negotiation, it can only be a crook or assassin you want to bump of the spouse or burn the business down for the insurance money.

Why would you want to negotiate with a business or person you know will not stick to any agreement reached and you will be forever employing lawyers to check the small print every time you order or sell to them and you know there will be a dispute over something or other and you may never or you will have to wait ages to get paid or recover your money.

There are only two reasons why you need to negotiate: You are in dispute or you want to do a deal. If you are in dispute there are a number of steps you have to take before you can begin negotiations, the first is reconciliation, the second is communication, the third is negotiation — sounds very much like being married.

The majority of us negotiate because we want to do a deal that is beneficial to all the parties involved. Negotiation is about compromise not setting up barriers that need defending, if you do not want to compromise then don’t bother negotiating, tell the other party you have no interest in doing business with them.

If you are interested in doing deals and deals is what makes your business profitable then you have to negotiate but, before you pick up the telephone to arrange a meeting make sure you are talking to the right party for this deal. Research is imperative, make sure you understand why your business needs this deal and what affect the deal will have on your business, is there another supplier/customer you could do a better deal with? Make sure you understand what you can negotiate away and what cannot be negotiated.

Once you understand why you want or need the deal go and find out everything you can about the target, ask around, check the newspapers, magazines, contacts in other businesses you know that have dealings with the target, your bank manager, is the target under money or time pressure, do they pay their bills etc. You would be surprised what little snippet of information may clinch a deal.

When negotiations begin never ever give away what you know about your target and never impart your business problems to the target. During the negotiations and if you have done your research you will hear the fear you can exploit that will clinch the deal and nine times out of ten it has nothing to do with price. It may be delivery times, stocking levels, storage, expertise, marketing, something that may be small and insignificant to you but extremely important to your target.

How do you find the fear? You ask questions and let the target talk and talk, never interrupt, never answer for the target, never show how clever you are by pre-empting, make notes and listen, do not be afraid to rephrase a question to dig further, leave a little space between the target ending their answer and you starting the next question, you never know what they might add. Next time you watch a news programme listen to the reporter, if they are any good their questions will find the answers and if they know there is a little more to come listen for the silence.

In summary make sure you know why you want to negotiating, carry out in-depth research, prepare, ask questions and don’t be afraid to say No. Never confuse Negotiation for Selling they are two different skills.

A Brief Guide of Bentley Motors, Past and Present

Bentley Motors in Crewe, England has a lengthy history of both the manufacturing and the racing of luxury cars. The company was founded in 1919 by its Walter Bentley, known previously for his range of military aero-engines, in particular the engine for the Sopwith Camel.

It was from here Walter Bentley found that his use of aluminium in the construction of his aero-engines and components both gave better performance and durability, let alone many options for casting and machining. As at this period in history many manufacturers were still replying heavily on cast steel components, thus making them heavy, prone to overheating and less durable.

So with this new type of engine, Walter Bentley applied it to the first cars and in 1921 the first Bentley the BR1 came off the production line. A year later Bentley cars were seen at numerous races and hill-climbs around the UK and even entered into the American Indianapolis 500 endurance race. But it was two years later in 1924 when Bentley was finally put on the map with a coveted win at the Le Mans 24 Hour race in France. To top this Bentley cars went on to win no less than four consecutive race wins from 1927 to 1930.

After the 1929 Wall Street Crash in the USA, Bentley car sales severely slumped world-wide. The problem became so severe the company was sold to the Rolls Royce Corporation in 1931. Fast forwarding to the present-day, the Bentley marque which has been owned by the German car manufacturer Volkswagen AG since 1998 is proving to be now as popular as ever. Even with the current global uncertainty the Bentley brand is enjoying a re-surge in sales in many emerging markets around the world, like India, Qatar and China.

Bentley has gone through much transformation in the last 10 years with its new owners, the cars are still hand-made and hand-finished in the same factory in Crewe, plus they are still produced with such high standard and attention to detail.

The new 2012 Bentley Continental GTC has just been launched just over a month ago and features an all new lighter body and chassis, with a slightly more powerful engine which will also run on bio-ethanol fuels. The car has received much critical acclaim and all important new orders.

Other new forthcoming developments are the option of diesel engines across the range of vehicles. The diesel engines expected to be used are the V8 TDi and V12 TDi powerful and economical engines, which have been developed by the Volkswagen group.

Presentation Skills: 5 Tips for Keeping Your Voice Healthy

Your voice is a key part of your presentation delivery. And having a tired, hoarse voice can negatively impact your presentation.

I’ve conducted many training programs where I’ve had to present for five or six hours a day for five days in a row. And I’ve also sung in choirs and as a soloist. So I understand how important it is to take care of my voice so I can rely on it being ready when I need it.

Here are my five tips for keeping your voice healthy:

  1. Hydrate
    Drink plenty of water, and not just during your presentation, but also before your presentation so you can stay hydrated. Room temperature or warm water works best for me. I also drink warm tea without caffeine. I find that cold water, particularly ice water, actually constricts my vocal cords, and makes me feel hoarse, making it much harder for me to project my voice. Gargling with warm water and salt also helps (and the salt is natural disinfectant). Find something that works to keep your voice well lubricated.
  2. Control the room environment
    Sometimes you’re in a room that is too hot, too cold or dry and that can quickly give you a sore throat. Check out the room before you present and decide if you need to open a window, lower the heat or increase the air conditioning.
  3. Rest
    Rest is crucial. You need adequate sleep the night before a presentation so your voice sounds rested (and you are alert and focused). And you should rest your voice, so no screaming at a sporting event the night before. You can’t fake rest – if your voice is tired, people will hear it. If you’re going to do several presentations over a few days or conduct multi-day training programs, you have to accept the fact that you will tire your voice and will need extra rest. It’s like working out – if you do bicep curls with weights, you expect that your muscles will be sore the next day. As you gradually build up strength, you’ll be able to lift more weights without feeling as sore. The same is true with your voice.
  4. Breathe
    Breathing properly keeps your voice supported. Take full deep breaths from your diaphragm and core that will support your voice to the end of the sentence, rather than taking shallow breaths from the top of your chest that cause you to run out of air. If you do yoga or Pilates, or you swim or sing, use that same kind of breathing.
  5. Warm up your voice
    In preparation for your presentation, do some vocal warm-ups, much the same way as you would do flexibility stretches with your body. Vocalize from high to low – just open your mouth wide and say “ah,” making a continuous sound with a pitch that goes from high to low. Pronounce consonants and vowels and really move your lips. Repeat the “t” sound and the “k” sound, for example.

Screw up your face and then relax it. You may feel silly doing these exercises but they will help you loosen up and open up your voice.

If you follow these five tips and take care of your voice before, during and after your presentation, you can keep your voice sounding energized, full, supported and healthy.