Future News for Present Decisions

News in the traditional sense does not usually affect the day-to-day decisions of people. The weather forecast may lead you to bring a coat or umbrella to work, but it would rarely cause you to feel that you need to switch careers or make life-changing decisions. However, in the world of stocks, futures, and Forex trading, there is a type of news that can alter the fate (and profit) of trillions of dollars. If you are into investing, future news is something you should monitor consistently.

If you practice a passive approach to current events, weather forecasts, and showbiz news, it’s a totally different thing if you are involved in investments and get regularly updated with future news. If you do not wish to lose money by making poor investment decisions, you have to subscribe to a service that can deliver fresh future news and other updates that can help determine if you’re putting your money on the right investment tracks. Getting future news subscriptions has its advantages. You get to:

1. Familiarize yourself with patterns in Forex, futures, and stocks that may prove useful in making investment decisions
2. Be alerted for unfavorable trend patterns that can help you avoid investing at the wrong places
3. Establish a personal record of the “goings on” in the market that you can use for reference, and;
4. Gain information from trusted knowledge sources that are unlikely to report errors and, in turn, cause you to make ill-advised decisions.

There are many ways of getting future news on a regular basis. Executives and professional traders subscribe to trusted services that can deliver updates on a regular basis. Others prefer to hire a professional who will personally collect data and report what he/she has learned at the end of a trading day. Others rely on buying spreads of newspaper to check out the figures and learn a few finance-related headlines that might concern them.

Whatever your method of getting future news is, always remember that individuals who do not want to lose in investment deals should gather accurate information that he/she can use to make wise investment decisions. If you are not a professional and need help in interpreting stocks, futures and Forex trading facts, perhaps subscribing to an informational future news service is what is best for you. Thousands of people gain a considerable part of their income from stocks, futures, and Forex trading, so don’t let yourself be at the losing end because you don’t know enough about what you are trying to invest in.

The Easy Presentation That Isn’t

Do you frequently or periodically make essentially the “same” presentation or speech? Perhaps, as Human Resources Director in a large organization, you regularly welcome new employees. Maybe you, as a department head in your marketing firm, initiate the weekly meeting of your group. You may, as City Engineer, routinely brief the City Council at its monthly meeting. As Engineering Dean, I frequently welcomed groups of high school students and their parents who were visiting our and other colleges of engineering to help them decide what university they may want to attend.

The good news about these apparently routine presentations is that they are easy, that is, relative to some of the critical one-of-a-kind speeches we also prepare for and present and sometimes dread. The bad news about the apparently routine presentations is also that they are easy. And, therefore, we may not give them proper attention, we get careless, we lose our edge, the audience knows it, and we fall short of the intent of oour communication.

More specifically, when we give the same presentation over and over, we may inadvertently fall into these traps:

1) Verbal graffiti: “Ah,” “you know,” “um,” and “he/she goes,” are examples. This happens because we are not thinking, not focusing-we are on autopilot. Think you don’t do this? Maybe you don’t, but why not verify? The next time you make that routine presentation, unobtrusively place an audio recorder on the lectern or table and, at your leisure, listen to yourself.

2) Negative body language or distracting behavior: Examples are holding our arms across our chest as we speak, which many interpret as your being autocratic and not open to input; failing to make eye contact with all portions of the audience; and excessive fiddling with our eye glasses.

3) No enthusiasm: You used the same words and sentences so many times that you just can’t get up for it. For example, I once worked in an organization where the chief executive, whenever he spoke and whoever he spoke to, always began with an expression like “I am pleased to be here”-got a little old.

For some of us who give that frequent speech to what is always a new audience, please consider the applicability of this advice: We get only one chance to make a first impression. Let’s leverage those “one chance” speaking opportunities.

Some thoughts for improving your “stump speech”:

1) Listen to a recording of your current presentation, as suggested above, or ask a colleague or friend to critique your speech. Identify strengths and weaknesses. Build on the former and fix the latter.

2) Commit to minimizing verbal graffiti. You don’t have to give a presentation to do this. Work at eliminating meaningless word and sounds in you every day conversations.

3) Find or develop a new opening each time, such as a story, metaphor, quote, or example. Yes, this requires extra effort. One benefit of that effort: thinking deeper about your audience and what you want them to learn and/or do. Using a new opening also adds freshness to your comments.

As stated by writer and author, Patricia T. O’Connor, “An audience is a terrible thing to lose.” That is exactly what happens when your audience senses that you are simply going through the motions. Instead, make them feel special. While you have presented the message many times, for them it should be as though it is the first time.

Developing a Presentation – Extracting Ideas From Social Media

The range of media available to us today can be seemingly endless, and each type of media allows opportunities to develop presentation ideas. When stuck for a message for a meeting or event, your solution could be in one of the newest of the many forms of media – Social media.

When I talk about social media, this includes sites such as Facebook and MySpace which allow you to see and interact with others online. Social media is an online presence where the content is produced and shared by the users of the media rather than the operators of the system.

These sites incorporate a function where users are able to provide updates about what they are doing and thinking about and users also have the capacity to upload pictures and clips which have caught their attention or interest.

A clip which is widely shared in this way is referred to as having gone Viral. Introducing your presentation through referring to a viral clip or posting from social media establishes a link with those of your audience who had previously been exposed to the clip. It also demonstrates to your audience that you are aware of things happening in the broader community.

There are however things to be aware of in relation to the use of “Viral” media. The first is that the on-line world moves extremely quickly and where clothes might last a season (or more) things that are current and everybody is talking about today can be forgotten in a week or two. There are exceptions such as the audition clip of Susan Boyle which gained such a high and lasting profile in transitioned from social to news media, however for most viral media the shelf life is very short.

Also consider the audience when using social media references. Do you think the majority of the audience are likely to be familiar with social media? If so and you spend too much time describing the media article which they have already seen for themselves, their attention will soon wane.

From the opposite point of view, also be aware of making assumptions. If you introduce your presentation with a reference to a social media clip without enough content or background to explain it, those that have not seen the media item will not understand the reference. In practice it is a balancing act and the successful speaker will need to find a middle point to meet the whole audience.

Another social media platform is Twitter, and no, those posts from people using the site should not be referred to as a twit, rather they are called tweets and provide a very short comment about what the user is thinking.

An interesting function in Twitter is the trend information. Trend data allows users to see what topics and authors are currently popular and this, like the viral clips, provides an insight into what things are of interest to many people at any given time.

Incorporating content that you know is on broad interest is going to increase your opportunities to engage your audience and bring them with you through the presentation journey.

Tips for taking telling to a true transfer of ideas

· Social Media can provide very up to date information on what is of interest in the community
· Use social media that is fresh and recognise it’s generally short shelf life.
· Provide an appropriate amount of context around the social media content, don’t over explain or provide too little background