Negotiating Do You Need To?

Whilst browsing the internet I came across a number of articles on negotiating and having read several began to wonder who these people were negotiating with and why were they bothering to negotiate at all. I was amazed at the language used in the articles and the suggestion that you would want to negotiate with someone you know is going to con you, stitch you up or rip you off. What does the person or organisation you distrust have that is worth the effort of negotiation, it can only be a crook or assassin you want to bump of the spouse or burn the business down for the insurance money.

Why would you want to negotiate with a business or person you know will not stick to any agreement reached and you will be forever employing lawyers to check the small print every time you order or sell to them and you know there will be a dispute over something or other and you may never or you will have to wait ages to get paid or recover your money.

There are only two reasons why you need to negotiate: You are in dispute or you want to do a deal. If you are in dispute there are a number of steps you have to take before you can begin negotiations, the first is reconciliation, the second is communication, the third is negotiation — sounds very much like being married.

The majority of us negotiate because we want to do a deal that is beneficial to all the parties involved. Negotiation is about compromise not setting up barriers that need defending, if you do not want to compromise then don’t bother negotiating, tell the other party you have no interest in doing business with them.

If you are interested in doing deals and deals is what makes your business profitable then you have to negotiate but, before you pick up the telephone to arrange a meeting make sure you are talking to the right party for this deal. Research is imperative, make sure you understand why your business needs this deal and what affect the deal will have on your business, is there another supplier/customer you could do a better deal with? Make sure you understand what you can negotiate away and what cannot be negotiated.

Once you understand why you want or need the deal go and find out everything you can about the target, ask around, check the newspapers, magazines, contacts in other businesses you know that have dealings with the target, your bank manager, is the target under money or time pressure, do they pay their bills etc. You would be surprised what little snippet of information may clinch a deal.

When negotiations begin never ever give away what you know about your target and never impart your business problems to the target. During the negotiations and if you have done your research you will hear the fear you can exploit that will clinch the deal and nine times out of ten it has nothing to do with price. It may be delivery times, stocking levels, storage, expertise, marketing, something that may be small and insignificant to you but extremely important to your target.

How do you find the fear? You ask questions and let the target talk and talk, never interrupt, never answer for the target, never show how clever you are by pre-empting, make notes and listen, do not be afraid to rephrase a question to dig further, leave a little space between the target ending their answer and you starting the next question, you never know what they might add. Next time you watch a news programme listen to the reporter, if they are any good their questions will find the answers and if they know there is a little more to come listen for the silence.

In summary make sure you know why you want to negotiating, carry out in-depth research, prepare, ask questions and don’t be afraid to say No. Never confuse Negotiation for Selling they are two different skills.

Job Negotiation Tips – Strategies to Get a Raise

You’ve been in your company for over three years now. You know that you have put in your worth in terms of salary, and more besides. You’re loyal, you’re polite and even warm to the bosses, you are nice to everyone in the office, and you know that you are the epitome of being a model employee.

But somehow, you are dissatisfied with how they compensate you. You surely want more. No one wants a salary fit only to buy milk. And this is when you should work on your raise-asking skills. And I’m pretty sure. You are desperate for job negotiation tips to show you the way.
If you notice, no one ever got to the top by waffling or being indecisive. Let’s look at the facts. Though Bill Gates played it nice, at the end of the day, he made an empire for himself by seizing things at the right moment, through shrewd strategy, stealth, and force that is unmatched.

Though negotiation should never be overtly forceful, it needs the gumption backed by shrewdness and strategy that we see in dynamic CEOs.

Job Negotiation Tip #1: Think Like a Would-Be Bill Gates.

When executives think, they don’t waffle about. They brainstorm, research, strategize, and go into battle fully armed. Attack your raise-asking similarly. Mull over how you are going to get it. Research on how others got that raise. Research on the salaries of people on your level. Strategize on how you are going to do the timing of your salary-raise pitch. And arm yourself with courage, and a leak-proof plan on how to make your pitch to your boss.

Job Negotiation Tip #2: Applying the CEO Traits The Right Way

Of course, it’s a big no-no to ask for a raise with an ego like the stereotypical CEO. When you go negotiate for that raise, leave the CEO ego behind, but keep the following traits:

● Keep a sharp mind at all times. When your boss interrogates you why you deserve that raise, be sure to back it up with the evidence why. Build a tight case. Make sure he can’t say no.

● Be persuasive. Study the right words people use to get that raise surely. Pattern your pitch after the best raise-getting talks, and do it with that CEO confidence.

● Strike a balance between dynamism and humility. Be confident, but not egotistical, be aware of your strengths, but not be full of yourself, and never show that you feel like you’re better than anyone else. Truly great people are humble.

Job Negotiation Tip #3: Learn More to Earn More

To get that CEO attitude down pat (to use for job negotiation), learn from the best of them. Learn from the best CEOs in the industry. Learn from Bill Gates. He toppled over Steve Jobs’ head start in the personal computing industry through these key things:

● Being observant, picking up cues, and using these to your advantage.

–Bill Gates picked up on Steve Jobs’ passionate request to not release a mouse-based Operating System before Jobs did, and released one months before Jobs released his. The result was a blow dealt to Apple Computer that edged it out of the market.

–Observe the conditions in your workplace. Observe what makes it likely for your boss to grant a raise. Then use that knowledge when you move in for the kill.

● Researching to deepen your understanding of what you are about to tackle.
–Bill Gates had one of his employees look into how the Apple graphical, mouse-based operating system was created. This stealthy research gave him edge he needed to topple down Steve Jobs.
–Arm yourself with knowledge about your boss’ personality. What approaches persuade him to grant raises? Ask around, casually. Inject your probing in casual conversations with those successful in asking for a raise. Know what you are up against. Knowledge truly is power.

● Not being afraid to step up and take what you want by force.

–Bill Gates used the previous two skills to stack the cards against Steve Jobs. Eventually, he made the bold move and rendered Apple Computer crippled for ten entire years (1989-1998).

–No successful person ever succeeded by waiting for success to fall on his lap. Take heart, take courage, and go get that raise!

Job negotiation requires skill and strategy. These job negotiation tips are culled from the habits of those who made it to the top. Read, study, strategize, learn, mull over, and have courage. You can get that raise. Arm yourself with knowledge, and nail that raise!

Role of Presentations in Education

The impact of technology, especially presentation technology, in education is not bypassed. Presentations have a very special role in education and their positive impact in the process of teaching and learning is not questionable. Today it is common to use PowerPoint presentations in education. Students depend on quality education to survive in today’s competitive global community. You as a teacher are responsible for preparing your pupils for this competitive environment.

Regardless of the objective significance of a particular activity or topic, if your students do not find it sufficiently engaging and interesting, chances are bleak that they will be motivated to expend their efforts. However, if you make the coursework engaging for them by connecting it to their goals and interests, they will be more likely to invest time and effort. You, as a teacher with engaging educational presentations, can make a big difference by influencing your pupils. Educational presentations, by providing you with the scope of including engaging illustrations, go a long way in achieving this objective of student engagement.

Don’t Lecture Your Pupils-Engage!

Do not just lecture your pupils, it is old-fashioned. Include the personal aspect of your knowledge to engage your students. Educational PowerPoint presentations have the scope to accommodate interesting activities to make the coursework interesting. It is of paramount importance to make your students personally and intellectually involve with education. It is only possible if you succeed in bequeathing your own experiences to your students. Educational PowerPoint presentations can successfully give your students a virtual tour of the area they are studying. And, if you succeed in conveying emotional involvement via educational presentations, you will increase the chances of motivating your students to get seriously involved and study.

PowerPoint Presentations are the daily rituals of modern teaching and learning. As educational PPT presentations adopt the approach of two way communication, your students feel involved and important. They promote the significance of self-study and questions. Questioning helps break the ice and build positive student-teacher relations.

Educational PowerPoint presentations are a good way give education a personal touch by virtue of effective communication. PowerPoint presentations provide you with an opportunity to talk to your students and get them involved. They encourage your pupils to participate by making the coursework interesting.

The benefit PowerPoint presentations in academic settings is that they help you engage your students not just through words, but also through powerful visuals. Remember, some students learn better by hearing, but most of them learn better by seeing. Presentations possess the power of engaging students through the visual means. Use PowerPoint with effective PowerPoint backgrounds and relevant visuals and see the difference!